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February 08, 2006

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ooishigal

Hello, my fist time on your blog, your pictures are amazing!
Are you from switzerland?
I am, and i just openened my foodblog, so if you like to take a look,
A bientôt!

Jane Sunshine

I am definitely going to get the Nigel Slater book. Thanks

Laurie

Don't you mean the River Cottage Family Cookbook by Fearnley-Whittingstall and Carr? Not the River Cafe books which are by Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers.

Alice

Just ordered Nigel Slater's book off Amazon. I have come across one or two of his essays on the Web and, judging by them, I am sure his book will be fabulous.

kitschenette

*slapping forehead* Laurie, you are absolutely right. I meant the River Cottage Family Cookbook, not hte River Cafe Family cookbook (which I think doesn't exist). Sorry for the confusion!

Jane

Your selfraising flour thing! I get the same thing using american books on this side of the atlantic. Unusual flours and all sorts of things i've never even heard of (some books very annoyingly use brand names for ingredients), and measuring ingredients by volume which make no sense to me! Cups of butter? I'd be there all day trying to squish fridge-hard butter into a cup... so I stick conversion sheets into books to help, but I always get the feeling i'm messing it up slightly. Heh. Still, someday I'll get to know them all inside out.

I'd highly recommend the hugh fearnley whittingdale Meat book too if you like the river cottage one! What an education. Every cut and type of meat explained with loads of photos and drawings, and a heap of excellent recipies. A fantastic resourse, and got me on great terms with my local butcher.

thalia

I don't think the bicarb was the problem. Bicarbonate of soda and baking soda are the same thing. Baking powder is the other thing. Then there's cream of tartar. Depending on the level of acidity in the rest of the mixture you need different quantities of one or the other to do the raising.

I love the nigel slater book too. It helps me understand why he's not hugely fat as his other books are so fat-full. It just seems he has abstemious days in order to make up for the creme fraiche/butter richness of his other cooking.

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